Remembering to Remember – by Mark Koning


Every so often I find myself forgetting the reason behind why it is I am doing something, if in fact, I am trying to do two things at once. That is not to say that I cannot multitask, but I have to concentrate and remember that am multitasking.

  1. I need to work at a pace suitable for me, and
  2. I need to write things down or least keep all the things I am doing in vision at the same time, if that is possible.

Relying on my mind to remember, well, let’s just say that I am taking a chance. If I start thinking of something for too long a period of time while I am driving let’s say, there is a good chance I’ll miss a turn; though I usually figure out shortly after that I missed the turn.

Going down to the basement for one thing and then grabbing something else on the way, I’ll forget my primary objective. Sometimes I will even end up standing in the room questioning myself, “Why am here?” or “What was I going to do?”

I make mistakes at doing certain tasks because I forget to take all of the required steps, or how it is I did something before. I have become overwhelmed with things and felt lost. But I have also learned that the most important thing to remember is that it is okay, we all forget sometimes.

I think because of my brain injury I forget more often. I am pretty sure that the ability required for me to concentrate or retain information is a little more daunting than it is for others. And there it is, because of the fact that for the most part brain injury is invisible, it is easy to forget just how my injury has affected my mind and the role it plays in my life.

And that leads me to not just forgetting the things I mentioned above, but I’m not remembering all that is me. Not that the knowledge of me actually acquiring my injury is lost (I will never forget that), but how I have handled it. All that I have overcome and how I cope.

I need to remember these things.

I need to remember to slow down.

I need to remember to take notes.

I need to remember my resiliency and self-worth.

                                                                                                                                                                                                              At home I have notes on these things as daily reminders pinned to the wall or fridge or bathroom mirror. Not just “to do” lists, but lists on who I am and what I can accomplish.

One more thing I need to remember, that it is still okay, even the best of us forget. And nothing is unfixable.